Posts Tagged ‘Pensacola’

by Project Avalon

Here’s a new audio interview, and a new video presentation… discussing the Gulf oil crisis, the role of the alternative media, and the extensive and important learning to be had by all.

Both are wide ranging: the audio in particular. Recommended.

Audio interview with Bill Ryan by Tania from the Project Avalon Forum (88 mins)

Video presentation by Bill Ryan about the Gulf oil crisis and the situation in the Niger Delta (24 mins)

The video presentation is worth watching for Ed Kashi’s powerful 8-minute film CURSE OF THE BLACK GOLD, which I’ve appended on the end. See this, if nothing else. This is what’s being done to the human race when no-one in the first world is watching. The film Avatar comes to mind. It’s all right here on Planet Earth. You don’t have to go to Pandora.

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Marine Biologist Dr Rikki Ott speaks on Olbermann

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BP’s official video on their plans for intersecting and killing the well in the Gulf of Mexico.

Kent Wells explains the relief well drilling process and visits one of the drilling rigs for an update on well progress.

Very informative and explains the bottom kill method quite clearly.

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by Felicity Arbuthnot

For the people of the Gulf and the region – watching some of the most toxic pollutants known to man, being sprayed to disperse one of the most toxic pollutants known to man, unleashed as a result of man’s fallibility, in a near-global addiction to consumerism – it must be an environmental apocalypse now. One dispersant Corexit 9500, is four times as toxic as oil, and also disrupts the reproductive systems of organisms.

There is magic about those sun-sparkled coasts, translucent, shimmering, sapphire sea, later turning peach, apricot, deep blush, then seeming near blackberry as the sun falls and the dusk, then dark, takes over. Then the great pelicans sit sentry, on remains of old breakwaters, silhouetted against the moon’s  silvered light.

An all time memory is of the Mexican coast on the Gulf. One day remains apart, on some special mental shelf for treasures, oft taken down, wondered at, minutely re-savoured. Four of us hired a boat for the day, the others wanted to fish for marlin, I to relish the glittering ocean and sun. Lying below the little open wheelhouse, the old, toothless boatman and I quickly formed a bond. His boat was his life, he was an extention of it and it of him. His eyesight was phenominal. “Look, look”, he’d say, pointing somewhere into the distant horizon: “tuna ..” I could see nothing, but a few miles towards the spot, sure enough, the ocean boiled and churned with the great shoal.

Shark fins often glided along side the boat, their sleek elegance visible below the surface.

Another: “look ..”, a pointed, gnarled finger, and there would be the unmistakable spout from a whale, then a great, seemingly ocean-shuddering, roll or two. The Gulf hosts twenty nine marine mammal species, alone, including blue, beaked, fin, dwarf sperm and humpback whale. On 16th June, the first whale, a sperm whale, was found dead off Mississipi. Whales are thought to live up to one hundred and thirty years. The July 1st issue of “Nature” reveals remains of a sperm whale in Peru, thought to be thirteen and a half million years old. The whale is also thought to possibly be the world’s oldest species. If the oil industry turns out to be the biggest threat they have ever faced, that will be quite a first.

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Progress Updated June 28 - BP Oil Disaster Relief Well and Subsea Containment - Infographic Diagram - Click To Enlarge..

Follow-up to Video: The Gulf of Mexico Death Throes – Incredible Footage of the State of the Gulf Waters and the End Of Gulf Wildlife [Must Watch]

Author David Helvarg takes a flight from the shores of Alabama to the site of the BP Deepwater Horizon explosion. What he finds is disturbing.

Ten years ago I flew out to a BP Deepwater platform in the Gulf of Mexico to report on offshore drilling and was amazed I could see oil rigs all the way to the horizon. Now I’m appalled that from 2,000 feet up I can see heavy oil slicks all the way to the horizon.

On Monday, June 21, I flew out of Sonny Callahan Airport in Fairhope, Ala., with pilot Tom Hutchings of SouthWing, a nonprofit group whose T-shirt logo reads “Conservation through Aviation.”

Tom is an angular biologist with an MBA who loves to fly. John Wathan, who joined us, shooting photos and video through the open luggage door, is the Hurricane Creek Keeper, a member of Bobby Kennedy Jr.’s environmental group. An ex-construction contractor, John looks more like a former Hells Angel than a tree-hugger with his full white beard and red, white and blue headscarf.

John’s been flying with Tom since the third day after BP’s Deepwater Horizon rig sank and the Gulf of Mexico erupted with tens of thousands of barrels of oil per day, creating one of the most devastating eco-disasters in recent history.

In the days since I’d cut my “Saved by the Sea” book tour short to return to the Gulf, I’d been visiting oiled beaches, oiled pelicans, oil-soaked wetlands and the Louisiana Incident Command Center at a BP facility outside Houma where private security guards made me erase a digital photo of the building (I re-shot it from a public road). Scientists I know in Mississippi and Alabama both had the same reaction when I called them, laughing and saying they heard from me only during disasters (I’d last visited them after Hurricane Katrina).

We take off behind a Coast Guard Sentry aircraft and are quickly 1,000 feet over Mobile Bay.

“I’ve got some color, I got red in the bay,” John reports from the back of the plane, looking down where some oil appears to have floated in despite the bay’s freshwater outflow that has kept most oil at bay and off the state’s beaches until this week. Two miles out we spot our first wind-drift streaks of oil. 12 miles out the oil becomes more pronounced like the speckled fat in marbled meat.

“The water looks so unnatural the way the light comes off it now. It’s a dull yellow rather than shiny and sparkly reflections,” Tom notes.  He’s been flying these waters for 30 years.

“It’s flattened out the white caps [small waves],” John points out. “It’s like someone stretched Saran Wrap down on top of the water.”

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Note that this incredible infographic is 6 weeks out of date as of this post!! Click to See Full Image and Enlarge..

BP Oil Disaster - Benthic Community's Importance To Coastal Estuaries – Infographic Diagram - Click To Enlarge..

BP Oil Disaster Simultaneous Operations Overview - Infographic Diagram - Click To Enlarge..

BP Oil Disaster Relief Well and Subsea Containment - Infographic Diagram - Click To Enlarge..